Wheeling Walks Training Manual

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Chapter 3:
Getting Started:
Job Description of CHPP Coordinator
Chapter References

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Job Description of CHPP Coordinator

Work 10 hours a week for 16 weeks, or 160 hrs.
(4 - 8 weeks before CHPP and 12 weeks during CHPP)

Paid $15/hr. or $20/hr. if trained at Masters-level

$15/hr. x 160 hrs. = $2,400

$20/hr. x 160 hrs. = $3,200

Tasks

  • Reserve room for Steering Committee meetings.
  • Coordinate Steering Committee activities.
  • Remind Steering Committee members of meeting time and place each week.
  • Take meetings minutes. Type and distribute by e-mail within 48 hours after meetings.
  • Send invitations, follow-up on invitations, and recruit Community Advisory Board members.
  • Develop and place press releases in local newspapers.
  • Create and distributed flyers on CHPP to interested people.
  • Design and post posters.
  • Make presentations to appropriate community organizations.
  • Send personal invitations to key leaders and decision makers--administrators, natural helpers, and other individuals in positions of authority and/or influence.
  • Focus special recruitment efforts on laborers, lower-income, and minority groups, which are typically underrepresented in health programs.
  • Reserve site for CHPP sessions.
  • Develop program schedule.
  • Contact, make, and confirm arrangements for all session presenters.
  • Assemble materials and equipment for sessions, as needed.
  • Arrange for screenings, including personnel to conduct them.
  • Be present at all sessions to assist, as needed.
  • Support participants and presenters, as needed.
  • Seek sponsors, patrons, funders, and build credibility of Advisory Board to help with goals accomplish.

Chapter REFERENCES

1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Physical Activity and Health: a Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, Ga.: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1996.

2. NIH Consensus Development Panel on Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health. Physical activity and cardiovascular health. JAMA 1996; 276:241-246.

3. Pate RR, et al. Physical Activity and Public Health: a Recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine. JAMA 1995;273;402-407.

4. Fletcher, et al. Statement on Exercise: Benefits and Recommendations for Physical Activity Programs for all Americans. American Heart Association. Circulation 1996;94:857-862.

5. McGinnis JM, Foege WH. Actual causes of death in the United States. JAMA1993; 270:2207-2212.

6. West Virginia 1998 Behavioral Risk Factor Survey. WV DHHR, Bureau for Public Health, Office of Epidemiology and Health Promotion. April, 2000.

7. Glasgow RE, McCaul KD, Fisher KJ. Participation in worksite health promotion: a critique of the literature and recommendations for future practice. Health Edu Q 1993;20(3): 391-408.

8. Heaney C, Israel B. Social networks and social support. In: Glanz K, Lewis FM, Rimer BK, Eds. Health behavior and health education: theory, research, and practice (2nd Ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1997.

9. Purdey AF, Adhikari G B, Robinson SA, Cox PW. Participatory health development in rural Nepal: clarifying the process of community empowerment. Health Edu Q 1994;21:329-343.

10. Wallenstein N, Sanchez-Merki V, Drew L. (1999) Freirian Praxis in Heath Education and Community Organizing. In M. Minkler (Ed.), Community Organizing and Community Building. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, p. 195-211. Glasgow, et al., 1993

11. Green LW, and Kreuter MW. 3rd Edition. Health Promotion Planning: an educational and Ecological Approach. Mountain View, CA: Mayfield Publishing Company. 1999.

12. Reger B, Cooper L, Booth-Butterfield S, Smith H, Bauman A, Wootan M, Middlestadt S, Marcus B, Greer F. WHEELING WALKS: A Community Campaign Using Paid Media to Encourage Walking among Sedentary Older Adults. Prev Med Sept 2002;35:285-292.

13. Baker EA, Israel BA, Schurman SJ. A participatory approach to worksite health promotion. J Ambul Care Manage 1994;17(2):68-81.

14. Palank CL. Determinants of health-promotion behavior: a review of current research. Nurs Clin North Am 1991;6(4):815-832.

15. Stange KC, Strecher VJ, Schoenbach V J, Strogatz D, Dalton B, Cross AW. Psychosocial predictors in a worksite health promotion program. J Occup Med 1991;33(4):479-485.

16. Stange KC, Strogatz D, Schoenbach VJ, Shy C, Dalton B, Cross AW. Demographic and health characteristics of participants and nonparticipants in a worksite health promotion program. J Occup Med 1991;33(4):474-478.

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