Wheeling Walks Training Manual

subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link
subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link
subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link
subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link
subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link
subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link
subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link
subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link

Chapter 13:
Walking for Healthy Bones:
Why do you need strong bones?
What types of exercise strengthen bones?
How does walking (weight-bearing exercise) benefit bones
Will exercise alone protect my bones?

logo

Walking for Healthy Bones

 A walking program can help individuals build and maintain strong bones.  Like muscle, bone is living tissue that responds to exercise by becoming stronger.  Therefore, a physical activity, like walking, is an essential factor in bone health.

The benefits of physical activity on bone health have been demonstrated throughout the life cycle. Exercise can positively affect peak bone mass in children and adolescents; has been shown to help maintain or even modestly increase bone density in adulthood and; can assist in minimizing age related bone loss in older adults.1


Why do you need strong bones?

Strong bones, in conjunction with other factors, like diet and life style choices, may help prevent osteoporosis. 

Osteoporosis is a bone weakening disease that develops gradually and makes bones so fragile that they fracture with regular use. The disease is characterized by low bone mass and structural deterioration of bone tissue, which leads to increased susceptibility to fractures of the hip, spine and wrist. Once a bone fractures, osteoporosis is often very painful and crippling. 2-3

Facts about Osteoporosis

  • Osteoporosis is a major public health threat for 28 million Americans.  In the US today, 10 million people have the disease and 18 million have low bone mass - a risk factor for the disease.4
     
  • Women are 4 times more likely than men to develop osteoporosis.2
     
  • One out of two women and one in eight men over age 50 will have an osteoporosis-related fracture in their lifetime.3 
     
  • Osteoporosis leads to 1.5 million fractures a year.4

What types of exercise strengthens bones?

Two types of exercises are important for strengthening and maintaining bone mass and density: weight-bearing and resistance exercises.

  • Weight-bearing exercise is a physical activity that forces you to work against gravity.  Walking is an excellent weight-bearing exercise. 
  • Resistance exercise is a physical activity that uses muscular strength to improve muscle mass and strengthen bone.  Weight-lifting is an example of resistance exercise. 5

How does walking (weight-bearing exercise) benefit bones?

Weight-bearing exercise at any age benefits bone health.  Studies link physical activity with increased bone strength in children, teens, men and women, and even adults 90 years and older.  Weight bearing activities improve bone health for many reasons. 

  • First, weight bearing exercise appears to stimulate bone formation. 
  • Second, it strengthens muscles that, in turn, pull or tug on bones, keeping bones strong. 
  • Third, it improves your strength, balance and coordination – all which help reduce the risk of falls and bone injuries. 2

It is also important to note that walking can also be beneficial as a treatment for osteoporosis.  Walking is a weight-bearing exercise that can be done safely and can help slow bone loss. 5

Some studies show that when a weight-bearing exercise program is initiated, benefits can be seen in improved bone density after 9-12 months.  It is never too late to make exercise a healthy habit for life.6 


Will exercise alone protect my bones?

 Weight-bearing exercise alone is not enough to protect an individual from osteoporosis. Even if a person walks or does other weight bearing exercise regularly, failing to eat enough calcium rich foods, or making poor life styles choices will weaken the bones.2 Therefore, it is very important that each individual talks to her/his doctor about the risk of osteoporosis.

Next

 

About Us | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Contact Us | ©2003 Company Name