Wheeling Walks Training Manual

subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link
subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link
subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link
subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link
subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link
subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link
subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link
subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link


Self-Discovery, Synergy, and Other CHPP Essential Elements

logo

SELF-DISCOVERY, SYNERGY, and OTHER CHPP
ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS

The inclusion of self-discovery in one’s personal life in CHPP provides a synergistic setting for critical insight and problem solving. People from all walks of life and many sectors of the community (including local power brokers) come together to compare notes about what they are doing to address health in their own life. In the process, they realize they are not alone on their personal journey. CHPP provides an avenue for bringing interested individuals in a community together to make these discoveries and to journey together in pursuit of the goals they establish for themselves and the community.

In the structured supportive group setting created by CHPP, individuals share experiences, skills, resources, and frustrations. Such sharing helps the individuals involved better appreciate and understand the health-related needs of both themselves and the community at-large. In the process of discovering and examining the challenges and the barriers to living a healthy lifestyle, participants can identify and mobilize community resources to overcome and to improve health in a community. The exchange also contributes to a form of group cohesion that supports and inspires change, creating a synergistic cycle to motivate continued efforts.
In addition, people’s input in identifying and solving problems gives them an investment in the success of solutions. By this we mean that through the direct involvement of interested lay and professional individuals in problem identification and problem solving, a form of ownership emerges that reduces resistance to change and mobilizes talents, energy, and insights of all members. The process, therefore, creates a win-win situation for everyone.

COMMUNITY HEALTH PARTICIPATORY PLANNING
Conceptual Frame for a 12 Week Program

Information Sessions Experiential Action/Task Forces

Sessions 1,2,3,4,5 Practice: Nutrition
Wellness Information
Session 6,7,8
Needs/Issues defined
Sessions 9,10,11,12
Planning/Recommendations

Practice
Health Screenings
Healthy Eating
Physical Activity
Mindfulness
Spirituality
Social Support
Nutrition
Physical Activity
Stress Reduction
Mental, Emotional Spiritual
Addictive Behaviors
Funding
Organizational Charge

As the table illustrates, the three essential elements of CHPP are informational sessions, experiential practice, and task force activity. Each of these elements is important and no single element is any more important than the others. Each is designed to elicit
maximum participation from the participants and allows participants to interact in a way so that their importance in planning for the well-being of their community is valued by themselves and others in the group. The informational sessions allow the group to learn from local experts.

Adequate time is allowed for questions to bring the topic to a more personal level and to allow the group to interact. The experiential practice (pot lucks, energizers, screenings) is to allow the participants to utilize their knowledge and “try on” new ways of thinking and behaving. The task force work allows the participants to become part of the solution and to become energized to seek creative new ways to aid themselves, their friends and family, and their community.

Let’s review:

Strengths and Outcomes of the CHPP process:


• Participants come together to examine their health and the health of their community.

• Participants compare notes and realize they are not alone.

• Participants experience the challenges of attempting to live a healthy lifestyle.

• Participants experience community, society, and personal barriers to living a healthy lifestyle.

• Group cohesion contributes to a greater appreciation of the value of both a personal and community need to be healthier.

• Participants identify, reflect on, and discuss common barriers to being healthier (e.g., food-related, physical-activity related).

• Participants work together to identify and mobilize community resources toward overcoming barriers and establishing healthier habits and environments.

• Group cohesion works to overcome resistance to change and to mobilize the talents, energy, and insights of the group.

• Group cohesion mandates ownership of the problems, the solutions, the process, and the successes.

• Group cohesion develops meaningful input and commitment to the success of participants’ lifestyle process and to overall community planning/problem solving.

• The very nature of community ownership of its problems means the community is more well.

Exercise: As you read through the rest of the workbook, the strengths and outcomes of the CHPP process will become more clear to you. Right now, read through the above list again and think about each concept. Which of the concepts are not clear to you? Which concepts require you to “think outside the box”? Make comments below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

next

About Us | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Contact Us | ©2003 Company Name